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California leads US in milk production

Milk production increase boosts corn sales. California continues to lead the nation in milk production outpacing second place Wisconsin.

Milk production is on the rise according to reports released by the National Agricultural Statistics Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. As the U.S. dairy industry is a major market for feed corn, distillers dried grains and corn silage, the National Corn Growers Association noted that this trend benefits not only dairy but also grain farmers across the country.

"It is important to value our relationship with dairy farmers, a constant and valued customer for our product," said NCGA President Garry Niemeyer.  "In 2011 alone, it is estimated that the U.S. dairy herd will consume more than 800 million bushels of corn.  As they grow, so do we thus reemphasizing the importance of cooperation throughout the agricultural community."

The report indicates that production increases came from both a per cow production increase of 16 pounds and a herd expansion of 108,000 head since this time in 2010.  Notably, California continues to lead the nation in milk production outpacing second place Wisconsin by more than 1.2 billion pounds last month.

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