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Water is the number one important factor for growing forages
<p>Water is the number one important factor for growing forages.</p>

Water, fertilizer, protection keys for forage growth.

Water is the number one important factor for growing forage. Next, for bermuda grass or any hay field, is fertilizer.

Water, fertilizer and protection are top three components for growing and maintaining forages in pastures.

Ranchers should be mindful of these three important components when considering restocking beef cattle, says Dr. Larry Redmon, AgriLife Extension state forage specialist in College Station.

Redmon was one of several featured speakers at the recent beef herd rebuilding symposium at Camp Cooley Ranch near Franklin.

“The recent 2014 U.S. Drought Monitor map is looking better, but we still have parts of the state in drought,” he said. “The long-range forecast has much of the state improving and starting to ease back into higher production. As you are making your decisions to restock, we may not be out of the woods completely. Climatologists say these drought cycles typically last for 22 to 25 years. Just be cautious before testing the waters.”

Redmon said water is the number one important factor for growing forage. Next, for bermuda grass or any hay field, is fertilizer. He warned about managing winter pastures when overseeding warm-season perennial grass fields. Read more from the symposium.

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