Farm Progress

Joseph Oakes, a postdoctoral research associate at Virginia Tech's Tidewater Research and Education Center, said plant population influences yield, disease pressure, insect pressure and plant size.

John Hart, Associate Editor

August 15, 2016

2 Min Read
<p>Joseph Oakes, postdoctoral research associate at Virginia Tech&rsquo;s Tidewater Research and Education Center in Suffolk, Va. joins colleague Maria Balota, associate professor of crop physiology at the Tidewater Center after presenting his paper to the annual meeting of the American Peanut Research and Education Society</p>

Research conducted at the Tidewater Agricultural Research and Education Center in Suffolk, Va. shows 6  seeds per foot delivers the best return for peanut farmers in Virginia and Carolina region.

In a paper presented to the annual meeting of the American Peanut Research and Education Center, Joseph Oakes, a postdoctoral research associate working in Dr. Maria Baolota’s program at the Tidewater center, said plant population influences yield, disease pressure, insect pressure and plant size.

In the research conducted in 2014 and 2015 , Balota, associate professor of crop physiology,  and her team planted four commercial varieties and five breeding lines to see how the responded to four different seeding rates: 1  seed  per foot, 3  seeds per foot, 6  seeds per foot and 9  seeds per foot. Thrips and disease pressure were also  measured

Throughout the growing season, pod, yield and grading characteristics were determined at physiological maturity. The study continues this year under the guidance of Balota.

“Significant differences in yield and value were observed among plant populations in both years of the study, though the population with the highest yield varied over the two years,” Oakes explained at the APRES meeting.  “Overall yield increased with plant population, but tended to level off at a certain population.”

In both years, tomato spotted wilt virus decreased as plant populations increased, while sclerotinia blight increased as population increased, the research reveals. However, Oakes said there was no significant difference in tomato spotted wilt virus between the 6  seeds per foot planting rate and the 9  seed per foot planting rate. Both had the least amount of tomato spotted wilt in the plots.

In addition, results in 2014 showed no significant difference in yield between the 6 seeds per foot and the 9 seeds per foot planting rate. “The 6  seeds per foot seeding rate had the lowest amount of tomato spotted wilt and one of our highest yields, so that’s probably our ideal population,” Oakes said.

Oakes noted that in 2014 the variety Bailey delivered the highest yield at the 6  seeds per foot planting rate while the variety Wynne showed no significant difference between the 9 seeds per foot planting rate and 6  seeds per foot planting rate. The same rang true for the variety Emery.

“In general, the yield of the individual varieties performed similarly to each other,” Oakes explained. “This study will provide much needed clarification to peanut producers as to the proper seeding rate for peanut in the Virginia-Carolina region.”

 

About the Author(s)

John Hart

Associate Editor, Southeast Farm Press

John Hart is associate editor of Southeast Farm Press, responsible for coverage in the Carolinas and Virginia. He is based in Raleigh, N.C.

Prior to joining Southeast Farm Press, John was director of news services for the American Farm Bureau Federation in Washington, D.C. He also has experience as an energy journalist. For nine years, John was the owner, editor and publisher of The Rice World, a monthly publication serving the U.S. rice industry.  John also worked in public relations for the USA Rice Council in Houston, Texas and the Cotton Board in Memphis, Tenn. He also has experience as a farm and general assignments reporter for the Monroe, La. News-Star.

John is a native of Lake Charles, La. and is a  graduate of the LSU School of Journalism in Baton Rouge.  At LSU, he served on the staff of The Daily Reveille.

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