is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Serving: United States
RipeningSoybeanField oticki/ThinkstockPhotos

Soybean growers demand end to Trump's trade war with China

Trump administration in China for trade talks.

Soybean growers have taken to Twitter and other social media platforms with the hashtag #185DaysStillNeedTrade, along with the popular #RescindtheTariffs hashtag to continue demanding the Trump administration bring an end to its lingering trade war with China and help restore certainty and stability to the soy industry.

Trade talks between the U.S. and China began Jan. 7, in hopes of reaching a deal before March 1, when Trump has vowed to impose more tariffs if a deal to his liking isn’t reached before.

It has been six months since China retaliated against Trump’s 25% tariff on $34 billion worth of Chinese goods. That tariff, which took effect July 6, 2018, has rocked the foundation of a decades-old trade relationship U.S. soybean farmers built with China, the largest market for American beans. And, it has resulted in halted sales, plummeting crop prices, and a lack of security for farmers seeking funding for the 2019 season.

“We are anxious to see real progress to end this trade war quickly,” said Davie  Stephens, a soybean grower from Clinton, Ky., and American Soybean Association president. “This has been a long and costly half year for farmers, and we need stability returned to this market. We cannot withstand another six months.”

The value of U.S. soybean exports to China has grown 26-fold in 10 years, from $414 million in 1996 to $14 billion in 2017. China imported 31% of U.S. production in 2017, equal to 60% of total U.S exports and nearly one in every three rows of harvested beans. Over the next 10 years, Chinese demand for soybeans is expected to account for most of the growth in global soybean trade, making it a prime market for the U.S. and other countries.

U.S. soybean growers have realized a nearly 20% drop in soy prices since the threat of tariffs began last summer, and the future of soy growers’ relationship with China continues to be in jeopardy. China has pursued new means to procure soybeans and other protein crops, including maximizing soybean imports from other exporting countries, particularly Brazil.

Source: American Soybean Association

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish