Farm Progress

Nematode-resistant cotton may be the best option but currently less than a handful of varieties with only moderate resistance are available.Putting resistance into a variety with the yield and quality traits growers demand will not be easy.

Ron Smith, Editor

January 25, 2011

1 Min Read

Cotton farmers and the agencies and industries that support them have three to four years to come up with new products, techniques or a combination of currently available strategies to manage nematodes before they lose Temik, a mainstay for crop protection for some 40 years.

Resistant cultivars may be the best option but currently less than a handful of varieties with only moderate resistance are available and putting resistance into a variety with the yield and quality traits growers demand will not be easy.

In the meantime, those varieties moderately resistant to root knot nematodes may be a better option than some believe.

“They may be more beneficial than some folks have given them credit for,” said USDA-ARS nematologist Richard Davis, Tifton, Ga., during a panel discussion at the recent Beltwide Cotton Conferences in Atlanta.

Read the full article.

About the Author(s)

Ron Smith

Editor, Farm Progress

Ron Smith has spent more than 30 years covering Sunbelt agriculture. Ron began his career in agricultural journalism as an Experiment Station and Extension editor at Clemson University, where he earned a Masters Degree in English in 1975. He served as associate editor for Southeast Farm Press from 1978 through 1989. In 1990, Smith helped launch Southern Turf Management Magazine and served as editor. He also helped launch two other regional Turf and Landscape publications and launched and edited Florida Grove and Vegetable Management for the Farm Press Group. Within two years of launch, the turf magazines were well-respected, award-winning publications. Ron has received numerous awards for writing and photography in both agriculture and landscape journalism. He is past president of The Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association and was chosen as the first media representative to the University of Georgia College of Agriculture Advisory Board. He was named Communicator of the Year for the Metropolitan Atlanta Agricultural Communicators Association. Smith also worked in public relations, specializing in media relations for agricultural companies. Ron lives with his wife Pat in Denton, Texas. They have two grown children, Stacey and Nick, and two grandsons, Aaron and Hunter.

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