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The demand for locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables is increasing New Mexico State University is working with smallacreage growers to satisfy this growing market that includes individuals restaurants public schools and government institutions
<p>The demand for locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables is increasing. New Mexico State University is working with small-acreage growers to satisfy this growing market that includes individuals, restaurants, public schools and government institutions.</p>

NMSU helps small-acreage farmers meet demand for locally grown produce

Currently, the primary source of locally grown produce is farmers markets,

New Mexico State University is helping in the increasingly popular trend to eat locally. And small-acreage farmers who producer fruits and vegetable could be beneficiaries.

The change in consumer purchasing could be a windfall for small-acreage farmers around the state.
“In the Albuquerque metropolitan area, 80 percent of the fresh fruits and vegetables eaten come from outside of New Mexico,” said Michael Patrick, economic development specialist with NMSU’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences.

Currently, the primary source of locally grown produce is farmers markets, according to research Patrick conducted with a New Mexico Department of Agriculture Specialty Crop Grant. Read more.

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