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New insect control formulation, packaging approved

California gives nod to Altacor eVo.

Todd Fitchette

August 18, 2022

2 Min Read
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Navel orangeworm damage in a mummy almond nut. Todd Fitchette

New tweaks to a longstanding insect control product by FMC were recently approved by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation.

Altacor eVo offers a high load formulation that boasts minimal impacts to beneficial insects and ease-of-use for pesticide applicators.

Altacor eVo is powered by the same Rynaxypyr active ingredient as the original Altacor product, which has become a “gold standard” for control of Lepidopteran pests. The insecticide is labeled for use in in a variety of crops, including tree nuts, citrus, stone and pome fruit, olives, persimmons, grapes, and coffee.

New packaging provides easier mixing options, with 18-ounce and 45-ounce containers that allow for more efficient tank mixing with commonly used application systems.

The new formulation and packaging align well with spray rigs, allowing for an easy pour of one container. No more mixing and measuring.

“It makes it safer to use,” said Eric Castner technical manager with FMC.

Softer impacts

Altacor eVo also boasts several softer impacts. There is no bee statement on the label, if offers low to minimal impacts on beneficial insects, is supportive of integrated pest management ystems, does not flare secondary pests or mites, has a four-hour reentry interview and short post-harvest intervals, and has no signal word on the label.

“I’ve never seen a synthetic product with no signal word on the label, or such low impact on beneficials when combined with the toxicity this has on targeted pests,” said Issa Qandah technical service manager with FMC.

Qandah said the efficacy against the Navel orangeworm, a troublesome pest of concern in tree nuts, is unique in that it attacks all three stages – adults, larvae, and eggs – of the insect. Studies show that adults that encounter Altacor eVo, stop feeding within seven minutes.

The product is also effective in controlling coddling moth in walnuts.

About the Author(s)

Todd Fitchette

Associate Editor, Western Farm Press

Todd Fitchette, associate editor with Western Farm Press, spent much of his journalism career covering agriculture in California and the western United States. Aside from reporting about issues related to farm production, environmental regulations and legislative matters, he has extensive experience covering the dairy industry, western water issues and politics. His journalistic experience includes local daily and weekly newspapers, where he was recognized early in his career as an award-winning news photographer.

Fitchette is US Army veteran and a graduate of California State University, Chico. 

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