is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

  • American Agriculturist
  • Beef Producer
  • Corn and Soybean Digest
  • Dakota Farmer
  • Delta Farm Press
  • Farm Futures
  • Farm Industry news
  • Indiana Prairie Farmer
  • Kansas Farmer
  • Michigan Farmer
  • Missouri Ruralist
  • Nebraska Farmer
  • Ohio Farmer
  • Prairie Farmer
  • Southeast Farm Press
  • Southwest Farm Press
  • The Farmer
  • Wallaces Farmer
  • Western Farm Press
  • Western Farmer Stockman
  • Wisconsin Agriculturist

Texas researcher wins Cotton Physiology Award

JOHN BURKE, research leader of the USDA/ARS Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Unit, Lubbock, Texas, received the 2002 Cotton Physiology Research Award at the Beltwide Cotton Conferences in Atlanta.

He received $5,000 for the award, sponsored by the Micro-Flo Co. The announcement was made at the Cotton Physiology Conference, one of the 13 technical conferences that are part of the Beltwide.

Burke, who directs a program that evaluates the many facets of water and temperature stress responses in crops, received the Scientist of the Year award in 1996 for his research accomplishments in crop stress physiology.

Following doctoral work, Burke received a fellowship to Cornell where he worked on chloroplast metabolism. Later, he joined the USDA Photosynthesis Research Unit in Raleigh, N.C., where he evaluated chloroplast electron transport processes. He then joined the Plant Stress and Water Conservation Research Unit in Lubbock in 1982 and began a research career on plant responses to water and temperature stresses.

He earned his doctorate in cell biology from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, where he worked on purification and characterization of chloroplast electron transport components.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish