is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

  • American Agriculturist
  • Beef Producer
  • Corn and Soybean Digest
  • Dakota Farmer
  • Delta Farm Press
  • Farm Futures
  • Farm Industry news
  • Indiana Prairie Farmer
  • Kansas Farmer
  • Michigan Farmer
  • Missouri Ruralist
  • Nebraska Farmer
  • Ohio Farmer
  • Prairie Farmer
  • Southeast Farm Press
  • Southwest Farm Press
  • The Farmer
  • Wallaces Farmer
  • Western Farm Press
  • Western Farmer Stockman
  • Wisconsin Agriculturist
Corn+Soybean Digest

TECHNOLOGY APPLIED TO AG PROBLEMS

Armed with the latest high-tech research equipment, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Mississippi are investigating the genetic secrets of catfish, cotton, soybeans and other crops.

The goal of scientists at the ARS Mid South Area Genomics Laboratory in Stoneville, MS, is to improve these commodities by learning more about their genetic makeup.

Crops under study include cotton, soybeans, rice, sugarcane and catfish. The genomics lab is part of the Jamie Whitten Delta States Research Center at Stoneville.

To identify the gene responsible for a certain feature or trait, researchers use genetic landmarks known as DNA markers, which can be a gene or a section of DNA with no known function. The markers can tell them roughly where a particular gene is located on a chromosome. When a DNA marker is associated with a physical trait, such as disease resistance, this helps guide breeders to more effectively add, delete or modify desirable traits in farm crops or animals.

The laboratory has been instrumental in determining 70,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from upland cotton. These short DNA sequences greatly speed the identification of important cotton fiber genes.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish