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Subcommittee Focuses on Climate Change Bill

Subcommittee Focuses on Climate Change Bill

Many questions still need answers.

The House Agriculture Committee's Subcommittee on Conservation, Credit, Energy, and Research held a hearing Wednesday to review economic analyses of the potential economic impacts of climate change on the farm sector. Subcommittee chairman Tim Holden, D-Penn., says it is clear there is still a lot of uncertainty with some of the modeling assumptions and data used to estimate the potential impact of climate change and climate change legislation on agriculture. Holden concluded that additional questions must be asked and answered before drawing any definitive conclusions.

 

Subcommittee Ranking Member Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., says the hearing demonstrated that there are serious economic consequences for farmers under cap and trade due to higher energy prices and increased operating costs associated with it. Goodlatte says the impact climate change legislation would have on the future of agriculture needs to continue being studied.

 

Thursday the Subcommittee will hold a second hearing to focus on research related to the potential costs and benefits of agriculture offset proposals to address climate change.

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