is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

  • American Agriculturist
  • Beef Producer
  • Corn and Soybean Digest
  • Dakota Farmer
  • Delta Farm Press
  • Farm Futures
  • Farm Industry news
  • Indiana Prairie Farmer
  • Kansas Farmer
  • Michigan Farmer
  • Missouri Ruralist
  • Nebraska Farmer
  • Ohio Farmer
  • Prairie Farmer
  • Southeast Farm Press
  • Southwest Farm Press
  • The Farmer
  • Wallaces Farmer
  • Western Farm Press
  • Western Farmer Stockman
  • Wisconsin Agriculturist
Study Considers Holstein Production and Reproduction

Study Considers Holstein Production and Reproduction

Fertility decreased in cattle chosen for higher milk production.

Since the U.S. dairy industry intensified selective breeding efforts in the 1960s, average milk yield in Holsteins has doubled, but the cattle are less fertile. A comparison of DNA from cattle selectively bred for milk production versus cattle isolated from such practices shows a genetic link between increased yields and reduced fertility.

 

Researchers at the Agriculture Research Service's Animal and Natural Resources Institute in Beltsville, Maryland teamed up with colleagues at the University of Minnesota to compare the genomes of modern Holsteins with those of UM cattle never exposed to the modern selective breeding practices. The lack of exposure meant that DNA from the UM cattle were genetic time capsules of an era before the selection efforts intensified.

 

By analyzing 50,000 genetic markers, the researchers found that many of the chromosomal regions associated with increased milk yield were also associated with reduced fertility rates. The results also showed that up to 30% of the Holstein genome may be influenced by standard breeding practices.

The researchers say the results will help Holstein breeders and milk producers better understand tradeoffs between high yield and low fertility when selecting for more profitable dairy cattle.

 

 

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish