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Plenty of Propane Should Be Available for Drying Season

TAGS: USDA
Plenty of Propane Should Be Available for Drying Season
One way you can prepare to make sure you don't get caught in an artificial shortage caused by transportation obstacles, is to consider a summer fill for your tanks.

If you're concerned that it's late July and your corn is just now pollinating or just beginning grain fill, you may want to visit with your propane supplier soon. Should a slightly later than normal planting season turn into corn that needs to be dried at harvest, you will want to make sure you have ample supplies to get you through the drying season.

Get ready now: Things like dryer tune-ups or filling your propane tanks now could help lessen your chances of any problems with an in-season shortage of propane caused by transportation issues.

One way to do that is to burn less fuel. You can do that by having your dryer in top shape, which may mean having your dryer supplier do a tune-up and check the dryer to make sure it is working efficiently. If you have an older dryer that limped along in the last season with wet corn, 2009, you perhaps still have time to upgrade to a higher capacity, more efficient dryer which will burn less fuel to dry the same amount of corn.

Mark Leitman of the Propane Education and Research Council, a check-off funded group supported by the propane industry, says there should be ample supplies of propane. The increased activities in producing natural gas in North Dakota and other areas feeding the domestic market also mean that propane supplies will be adequate.

If any problems develop in getting enough propane to your farm on time, it will likely be in the delivery network that supports the propane industry, he says. If suddenly there is more wet corn than farmers expect and demand for propane spikes, it may be difficult to physically move enough propane fast enough to keep up with demand.

One way you can prepare to make sure you don't get caught in an artificial shortage caused by transportation obstacles, not a real shortage, is to consider a summer fill for your tanks, he says. Strengthen your relationship with your supplier now to increase your odds of having all the propane you need when you need it.

If you're concerned that it's late July and your corn is just now pollinating or just beginning grain fill, you may want to visit with your propane supplier soon. Should a slightly later than normal planting season turn into corn that needs to be dried at harvest, you will want to make sure you have ample supplies to get you through the drying season.

Every decision that you make influences the size and scope for corn yields. From the corn hybrid you select to the seeding rate and row width you choose. Download our FREE report over Maximizing Your Corn Yield.

One way to do that is to burn less fuel. You can do that by having your dryer in top shape, which may mean having your dryer supplier do a tune-up and check the dryer to make sure it is working efficiently. If you have an older dryer that limped along in the last season with wet corn, 2009, you perhaps still have time to upgrade to a higher capacity, more efficient dryer which will burn less fuel to dry the same amount of corn.

Mark Leitman of the Propane Education and Research Council, a check-off funded group supported by the propane industry, says there should be ample supplies of propane. The increased activities in producing natural gas in North Dakota and other areas feeding the domestic market also mean that propane supplies will be adequate.

If any problems develop in getting enough propane to your farm on time, it will likely be in the delivery network that supports the propane industry, he says. If suddenly there is more wet corn than farmers expect and demand for propane spikes, it may be difficult to physically move enough propane fast enough to keep up with demand.

One way you can prepare to make sure you don't get caught in an artificial shortage caused by transportation obstacles, not a real shortage, is to consider a summer fill for your tanks, he says. Strengthen your relationship with your supplier now to increase your odds of having all the propane you need when you need it.

If you're concerned that it's late July and your corn is just now pollinating or just beginning grain fill, you may want to visit with your propane supplier soon. Should a slightly later than normal planting season turn into corn that needs to be dried at harvest, you will want to make sure you have ample supplies to get you through the drying season.

One way to do that is to burn less fuel. You can do that by having your dryer in top shape, which may mean having your dryer supplier do a tune-up and check the dryer to make sure it is working efficiently. If you have an older dryer that limped along in the last season with wet corn, 2009, you perhaps still have time to upgrade to a higher capacity, more efficient dryer which will burn less fuel to dry the same amount of corn.

Mark Leitman of the Propane Education and Research Council, a check-off funded group supported by the propane industry, says there should be ample supplies of propane. The increased activities in producing natural gas in North Dakota and other areas feeding the domestic market also mean that propane supplies will be adequate.

If any problems develop in getting enough propane to your farm on time, it will likely be in the delivery network that supports the propane industry, he says. If suddenly there is more wet corn than farmers expect and demand for propane spikes, it may be difficult to physically move enough propane fast enough to keep up with demand.

One way you can prepare to make sure you don't get caught in an artificial shortage caused by transportation obstacles, not a real shortage, is to consider a summer fill for your tanks, he says. Strengthen your relationship with your supplier now to increase your odds of having all the propane you need when you need it.

Every decision that you make influences the size and scope for corn yields. From the corn hybrid you select to the seeding rate and row width you choose. Download our FREE report over Maximizing Your Corn Yield.

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