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FSA May Help With Weather Related Losses

FSA May Help With Weather Related Losses

Administrator reminds affected farmers and ranchers of FSA programs.

Many livestock producers throughout the Plains states and the Midwest are dealing with harsh winter weather, which is causing serious harm to livestock and forage due to heavy snow, ice and extremely cold temperatures.  USDA Farm Service Agency Administrator Jonathan Coppess reminds producers in those regions that FSA programs may be available to assist them.

"This is turning out to be a tough winter for many ranchers and farmers in the nation's heartland, and learning about our FSA programs is an important step for producers to take," Coppess said. "We need producers to document the number and kind of livestock that have died as a direct result of these winter storms and timely notify their local FSA office of these losses. Also, there may be situations where producers are transporting feed to their livestock. Producers should document these additional costs."

Among the key programs are the Livestock Indemnity Program and the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program. Coppess also encourages producers to use Hay Net on the FSA Web site, an online service that allows producers with hay and those who need hay to post ads so they can make connections.

TAGS: Livestock
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