is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

  • American Agriculturist
  • Beef Producer
  • Corn and Soybean Digest
  • Dakota Farmer
  • Delta Farm Press
  • Farm Futures
  • Farm Industry news
  • Indiana Prairie Farmer
  • Kansas Farmer
  • Michigan Farmer
  • Missouri Ruralist
  • Nebraska Farmer
  • Ohio Farmer
  • Prairie Farmer
  • Southeast Farm Press
  • Southwest Farm Press
  • The Farmer
  • Wallaces Farmer
  • Western Farm Press
  • Western Farmer Stockman
  • Wisconsin Agriculturist
U.S. Fields Looking 'Fabulous' on Northern Plains Wheat Tour

U.S. Fields Looking 'Fabulous' on Northern Plains Wheat Tour

Northern Plains tour official reports good conditions; record yield forecast if U.S. spring wheat crop stays healthy

Crop scouts predicted hard red spring wheat in the northern United States will produce a record 48.6 bushels per acre if it makes it to harvest in August and September without encountering harsh weather or disease.

They arrived at the estimate after touring fields in North Dakota, northern South Dakota and western Minnesota this week, where they saw healthy crops with little or no disease.

"The fields look absolutely fabulous," Ben Handcock, a tour official, told Farm Futures on Thursday. "If it continues to develop like it looks today it is going to be a really good crop."

Northern Plains tour official reports good conditions; record yield forecast if U.S. spring wheat crop stays healthy. (file)

Using USDA's estimate of 5.8 million harvested acres, a 48.6 yield would put North Dakota's production at nearly 282 million bushels, up 5.7% from USDA's latest estimate of 266.8 million and up 20% from the 2013 harvest.

Related: On Crop Tour, Dakota Spring Wheat 'Sure Looks Good'

Much of the spring wheat was planted late because of a wet spring and that will put harvest for many fields deep into September, increasing the chances for harsh weather.

"That is the only risk that I see," Handcock said of harvest-time weather.

Forecasts for the next two weeks call for normal to below-normal temperatures and below-normal rainfall in North Dakota, which Handcock said would be good for the crop.

"It doesn't need any precipitation. I think that would be good for the crop," he said of the forecasts.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish