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Fertilizer tech helps industry keep pace with planting advancements

Fertilizer tech helps industry keep pace with planting advancements

These tools help you plant fast and still apply fertilizer accurately and efficiently.

The company that has set a new bar for precision in plant spacing and uniform stands introduces two new concepts aimed to improve fertilizer delivery off the planter and make it more efficient. Precision Planting first introduces Furrow Jet, a starter applicator attachment that places liquid starter 3/4 inch to the side of each row, plus in the furrow.

GET FERTILIZER CLOSER: The Furrow Jet from Precision Planting moves fertilizer closer to the seed than traditional 2-by-2 placement without increasing risk of fertilizer burn.

The goal, spokespeople say, was to develop a more effective way to get fertilizer closer to young roots than traditional 2-by-2-inch placement, without burning the seed. Too much nitrogen directly contacting the seed can cause injury to the germinating seedling. If young roots can find N quicker than before, Precision Planting specialists believe plants will get off to a faster, more uniform start.

The second innovation which will be out for testing this spring is the vApply and vApplyHD individual row fertilizer application system. It could work not only to apply starter, but may also be transferred to the sprayer. Precision Planting spokespeople say it replaces the need for monitoring orifices and check valves to make sure each starter row unit is functioning.

What it does is bring individual row control to starter fertilizer application. It can also be used as section control to manage a bank of units.

The demand for this product is coming from those using high-speed planters who want a starter fertilizer system that will apply as much liquid starter as they need as quickly as necessary to match planting speed, spokespeople say.

TAKE CONTROL ROW BY ROW: Farmers were anxious to get a look at the vApply HD technology at the Precision Planting booth in Louisville earlier this year.

Here is what three Farm Progress editors who work with new products say about these innovations. The team includes Tom J. Bechman, Indiana Prairie Farmer, Mindy Ward, Missouri Ruralist and Lon Tonneson, Dakota Farmer.

1. Tom’s take on Precision Planting’s new products

Both products seem like innovative leaps forward. The Furrow Jet brings nutrients young plants need closer to the plants, still without risking fertilizer burn. That could be a plus for those who rely heavily on starter fertilizer.

The vApplyHD innovation sounds like a great accompaniment for those who want to use the new planter systems that allow faster planting. Starter fertilizer technology now matches planter technology. Learn more by visiting precisionplanting.com.

2. Mindy looks at the precision Furrow Jet can bring to the field

There has been a fine line of getting enough fertilizer close enough to the plant, especially in cold, wet soil, without damaging it. The Furrow Jet takes some of the risk out of the equation. Not only does it put the fertilizer where it can be used, but it also reduces the risk of fertilizer burn to young seedlings at the root.

With the vApplyHD, it’s all about speed. In years when planting windows shorten, this technology would prove helpful.

3. Lon believes no-tillers could be very interested in these products

These may be good tools for no-tillers to try. Many are trying to get more fertilizer down in one pass when planting. They don’t want to burn the seed or disturb the soil more than is absolutely necessary.

TAGS: USDA
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