is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

  • American Agriculturist
  • Beef Producer
  • Corn and Soybean Digest
  • Dakota Farmer
  • Delta Farm Press
  • Farm Futures
  • Farm Industry news
  • Indiana Prairie Farmer
  • Kansas Farmer
  • Michigan Farmer
  • Missouri Ruralist
  • Nebraska Farmer
  • Ohio Farmer
  • Prairie Farmer
  • Southeast Farm Press
  • Southwest Farm Press
  • The Farmer
  • Wallaces Farmer
  • Western Farm Press
  • Western Farmer Stockman
  • Wisconsin Agriculturist
Avian flu confirmed in Kansas backyard poultry flock

Avian flu confirmed in Kansas backyard poultry flock

Kansas case joins previous Avian Flu identification in Missouri, Arkansas, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington and Idaho

The Kansas Department of Agriculture on Friday confirmed samples collected from a backyard poultry flock in the state returned a presumptive positive result for highly pathogenic avian influenza at the National Veterinary Services Lab.

Related: Missouri Department of Ag monitoring control zone for Avian flu

The case, in Leavenworth County, is in addition to the areas of Cherokee and Crawford counties that are under surveillance after a confirmed case of the H5N2 strain of Avian Influenza was found in Missouri last week.

Kansas case joins previous Avian Flu identification in Missouri, Arkansas, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington and Idaho (file)

The case joins outbreaks of a strain of avian influenza in Missouri, Arkansas, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington and Idaho. They are not considered to be a threat to public health or the food supply.

Avian Influenza exists naturally in many wild birds and can be transmitted by contact with infected animals or ingestion of infected food or water.

Related: Avian Flu Will Have Notable Impact on Poultry Trade: Report

CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low.  No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

"We are dedicated to providing the necessary assistance and precautions to avoid any possible spreading of the disease," said Dr. Bill Brown, Kansas animal health commissioner.

Symptoms in poultry include coughing, sneezing, respiratory distress, decreased egg production and sudden death.

Source: KDA

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish