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Ag Groups Fighting EPA Dust Rule

A new EPA rule would regulate dust from agricultural sources.

A joint-brief was filed with the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals Tuesday urging review of an Environmental Protection Agency rule that would regulate dust from agricultural sources under the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Filing the brief was the American Farm Bureau Federation, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Pork Producers Council and the American Retailers Association.

"Everyday aspects of livestock and crop production, including tilling the soil and traveling on dirt roads to reach pastures and fields, can generate dust, particularly in dry areas," says AFBF President Bob Stallman. "EPA's insistence on regulating rural dust has the potential to negatively impact all areas of agriculture."

EPA studies conducted before the rule was released found no risk to public health from agricultural dust.

"EPA's regulation of dust in rural areas ignores the agency's findings and is improperly based on 'caution' rather than science," said Stallman. "If allowed to stand, this rule has the potential to curtail the efforts of hardworking farming and ranching families to provide food for our nation and the world."

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