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Articles from 2007 In September


Brazilian Soybean Growers Worried by Lack of Rain

September is typically a rainy month in Mato Grosso, the top soy-producing state in Brazil, but after showers in the areas of Sapezal and Lucas do Rio Verde on Sept. 17, no rain has fallen. Those rains prompted farmers to begin planting, but with no moisture since, many producers are concerned that they will have to replant the crop.

Mato Grosso is the usually the first Brazilian state to plant soybeans, but with moisture low and future rains uncertain, many producers are hesitant to begin planting.

Climate Change Conference Addressed by President Bush

President George Bush addressed the Climate Change Conference in Washington on Friday. He said the work at this conference needs to bring about a new approach to climate change. Fifteen major world economies gathered in Washington last Thursday and Friday to discuss climate change.

"We must lead the world to produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions," Bush said. "And we must do it in a way that does not undermine economic growth or prevent nations from delivering greater prosperity for their people."

According to USDA Global Climate Change Director Bill Hohenstein, that's a tall order considering that the U.S. and other nations differ on how to do that.

"Ultimately the President is hoping the leaders of these major economies can come to some consensus," Hohenstein said. He says it will likely take several more meetings to accomplish that goal.

Explosion of Soybean Rust Discoveries

On Friday, soybean rust was confirmed for the first time ever in Iowa as a case was found in DallasCounty in central Iowa.

Iowa was not the only place new findings of rust were found on Friday; 14 new counties made rust discoveries. Pickens County in Alabama; Burke, Sumter and Toombs counties in Georgia; Calhoon, Colleton, and Georgetown counties in South Carolina; De Soto and Tunica in Mississippi; Kingfisher County in Oklahoma; the second case ever found in Kansas was confirmed in Labatte County; and two additional counties were added to the list in Missouri with findings in Lawrence and Vernon counties.

Friday's explosion of rust brings the 2007 total for rust confirmations to 156 counties in 14 states. Current weather models predict further spreading of rust in the Midwest. To track Asian soybean rust, click HERE.

It's Congress' Move on Peru FTA

President Bush has sent bills to Congress that would implement the free trade agreement with Peru. Because the deal was negotiated before President Bush's Trade Promotion Authority expired in June, fast-track rules do apply. Congress will only be able to vote yes or no; amendments will not be allowed.

The

House Ways
and Means Committee will have 45 days to consider the bill. If they fail to send it to the House floor in that time, it will automatically be brought to the floor for a vote within 15 days. The Senate Finance Committee then has 15 days to consider the bill and another 15 days to have a floor vote on the agreement. So one way or the other, the Peru Free Trade Agreement will decided in the next 90 days.

No Early Release of CRP

Acting Agriculture Secretary Chuck Conner announced that CRP contracts will not be released early without penalties. USDA's grain stocks report Friday may have played a role in the decision. Beginning stocks of corn and soybeans for the new crop year were higher than expected. Also more than 2 million acres of CRP contracts expire this weekend.

Wheat, soybean and corn markets are providing very strong incentives to plant more acreage this fall and next spring. Throughout this year, the market focused on attracting corn acres and to a lesser extent wheat acres and producers reponded strongly," Conner says. "Overall, I expect that market signals will continue to provide adequate acres, recognizing that strong competition among crops is likely."

Conner does not plan to hold a general signup while grain prices are this high and stocks are so low. However; he says he'll keep a close eye on the situation and will not hesitate in the future to make adjustments.

 

Lack of Rain Worries Brazilian Soybean Growers

September is typically a rainy month in Mato Grosso, the top soy-producing state in Brazil, but after showers in the areas of Sapezal and Lucas do Rio Verde on Sept. 17, no rain has fallen. Those rains prompted farmers to begin planting, but with no moisture since, many producers are concerned that they will have to replant the crop.

Mato Grosso is the usually the first Brazilian state to plant soybeans, but with moisture low and future rains uncertain, many producers are hesitant to begin planting.

Peru FTA Goes Back to Congress

President Bush has sent bills to Congress that would implement the free trade agreement with Peru. Because the deal was negotiated before President Bush's Trade Promotion Authority expired in June, fast-track rules do apply. Congress will only be able to vote yes or no; amendments will not be allowed.

The House Ways and Means Committee has 45 days to consider the bill. If they fail to send it to the House floor in that time, it will automatically be brought to the floor for a vote within 15 days. The Senate Finance Committee then has 15 days to consider the bill and another 15 days to have a floor vote on the agreement. So one way or the other, the Peru Free Trade Agreement will decided in the next 90 days.

Bush Addresses Climate Conference

President George Bush addressed the Climate Change Conference in Washington on Friday. He said the work at this conference needs to bring about a new approach to climate change. Fifteen major world economies gathered in Washington last Thursday and Friday to discuss climate change.

"We must lead the world to produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions," Bush said. "And we must do it in a way that does not undermine economic growth or prevent nations from delivering greater prosperity for their people."

According to USDA Global Climate Change Director Bill Hohenstein, that's a tall order considering that the U.S. and other nations differ on how to do that.

"Ultimately the President is hoping the leaders of these major economies can come to some consensus," Hohenstein said. He says it will likely take several more meetings to accomplish that goal.

Rust Continues to Spread

On Friday, soybean rust was confirmed for the first time ever in Iowa as a case was found in Dallas County in central Iowa.

Iowa was not the only place new findings of rust were found on Friday; 14 new counties made rust discoveries. Pickens County in Alabama; Burke, Sumter and Toombs counties in Georgia; Calhoon, Colleton, and Georgetown counties in South Carolina; De Soto and Tunica in Mississippi; Kingfisher County in Oklahoma; the second case ever found in Kansas was confirmed in Labatte County; and two additional counties were added to the list in Missouri with findings in Lawrence and Vernon counties.

Friday's explosion of rust brings the 2007 total for rust confirmations to 156 counties in 14 states. Current weather models predict further spreading of rust in the Midwest. To track Asian soybean rust, click HERE.