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Orchard biocontrol workshop Feb. 22-23 in Stockton

The University of California, Washington State University and Oregon State University have developed an interactive short course on enhancing orchard pest management by incorporating biological control.

*Editor's note: This workshop has been cancelled.

The University of California, Washington State University and Oregon State University have developed an interactive short course on enhancing orchard pest management by incorporating biological control.

The two-day short course will be conducted Feb. 22-23 at the Robert J. Cabral Agricultural Center in Stockton, Calif.

The course costs $120. Registration deadline is Feb. 8.

“The course focuses focus on how the new development in selective insecticides has opened a big door in allowing for biocontrol organisms to actually be used,” according to UC IPM specialist Walt Bentley.

Natural pest enemies interact well with newer pesticides in both conventional and organic agriculture, according to Bentley.

This new interaction along with identifying key natural enemies in orchards are part of the course, which will also cover:

  • Natural enemy lifecycles.
  • Pesticide effects on natural enemies.
  • Secondary pests.
  • Disruptive effects of pesticides and natural enemy recovery time.
  • Examining codling moth virus, Bt and parasitic nematodes.
  • Importance of insect resources.
  • Designing an IPM program incorporating biological control.

To register, go to http://ucanr.org/biocontrolreg.

For more information go to: http://enhancedbiocontrol.org.

Continuing education credit will be available. The course was developed as part of a Specialty Crops Research Initiative.

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