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Honey laundering fraud threatens U.S. food supply

Honey laundering fraud threatens U.S. food supply

Contaminated Chinese honey continues to pour into the U.S. food supply. Despite a recent $80 million honey fraud case, purported to be the largest food fraud in U.S. history, tainted honey imports continue.

From the Globe and Mail:

As crime sagas go, a scheme rigged by a sophisticated cartel of global traders has all the right blockbuster elements: clandestine movements of illegal substances through a network of co-operatives in Asia, a German conglomerate, jet-setting executives, doctored laboratory reports, high-profile takedowns and fearful turncoats.

What makes this worldwide drama unusual, other than being regarded as part of the largest food fraud in U.S. history, is the fact that honey, nature’s benign golden sweetener, is the lucrative contraband.

Honey has become a staple in the North American diet. Those that do not consume it straight from bear-shaped squeeze bottles eat it regularly whether they know it or not – honey is baked into everything from breakfast cereals to cookies and mixed into sauces and cough drops. About 1.2 million metric tons of honey is produced worldwide each year.

Honey laundering: The sour side of nature’s golden sweetener

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