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Time for another agricultural revolution?

As leaders debate how to combat record food prices and producers struggle to meet rapidly-growing demand, the world is looking for a new agricultural revolution. And some are beginning to question whether last century’s approach was, in fact, green enough.

From the Wall Street Journal:

The term “Green revolution” was first used in 1968 by former director of the U.S. Agency for International Developments William Gaud to describe a set of new technologies that had quadrupled yields in the developing world and reaped a record harvest the year before.

“We are on the verge of an agricultural revolution,” he told his peers at a meeting in Washington.

“It is not a violet Red Revolution like that of the Soviets, nor is it a White Revolution like that of the Shah of Iran. I call it the Green Revolution. This new revolution can be as significant and as beneficial to mankind as the industrial revolution of a century and a half ago.”

Now, as leaders debate how to combat record food prices and producers struggle to meet rapidly-growing demand, the world is looking for a new agricultural revolution. And some are beginning to question whether last century’s approach was, in fact, green enough.

For more, see: Time for Next Agricultural Revolution?

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