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aerial shot of farmland from plane Tyler Harris
EQUITABLE ARRANGEMENT: Establishing an equitable rental rate is a priority when considering adjustments to land leases for property affected by flooding.

Talking ag land rental arrangements at HHD

Down in the Weeds: Ag economist Jim Jansen discusses adjustments for different scenarios.

Editor's note: You can listen to my conversation with Jim Jansen by clicking on the Soundcloud file embedded in this blog.

In the wake of heavy rainfall and extreme flooding this year, landlords and tenants across the state of Nebraska have wondered how damage from flooding will affect land leases.

In the latest Down in the Weeds — the first of three live podcasts recorded at Husker Harvest Days —  we spoke with Jim Jansen, Nebraska Extension agricultural economist, on how land leases change when land is affected by flooding — including responsibilities for cleaning up and potential discounts for rental rates.

Following up a recent survey conducted as part of the 2019 Nebraska Farm Real Estate Survey, we also discussed how cover crops may affect cash rental rates.

"There are really two types of damages," Jansen explains. "The two types of damages that are going to be influencing lease negotiations moving forward, some people term them as heavy versus hard work. Heavy work would involve dirt movers, various kinds of equipment that are typically commercial grade that the typical operator might not have. The hard work is cleaning up debris of various kinds, which a lot of that has gone on through the summer and may extend through the following growing season."

Check back for more live recordings of Down in the Weeds from Husker Harvest Days.

 

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