is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

  • American Agriculturist
  • Beef Producer
  • Corn and Soybean Digest
  • Dakota Farmer
  • Delta Farm Press
  • Farm Futures
  • Farm Industry news
  • Indiana Prairie Farmer
  • Kansas Farmer
  • Michigan Farmer
  • Missouri Ruralist
  • Nebraska Farmer
  • Ohio Farmer
  • Prairie Farmer
  • Southeast Farm Press
  • Southwest Farm Press
  • The Farmer
  • Wallaces Farmer
  • Western Farm Press
  • Western Farmer Stockman
  • Wisconsin Agriculturist
REBUILDING THE nationrsquos cattle herd has to start with farmerrsquos restocking says a Texas AgriLife extension economist And restocking may require patiencemdashuntil rangeland and pastures recover from drought
<p>REBUILDING THE nation&rsquo;s cattle herd has to start with farmer&rsquo;s restocking, says a Texas AgriLife extension economist. And restocking may require patience&mdash;until rangeland and pastures recover from drought.</p>

Strong beef prices predicted as herd slowly rebuilds

More than 1,500 beef cattle producers from across Texas and abroad gathered for the Beef Cattle Short Course.

Beef producers can expect record strong prices to continue but a Texas A&M animal science professor warns that rising prices could turn beef into a “specialty item” at supermarkets.

Bill Mies, visiting professor in the TAMU department of animal science, speaking at this week’s 60th Beef Cattle Short Course on the A&M Campus in College Station, said retail meat prices have increased as the cattle herd numbers have declined and could have the potential to rival the pricing power of lobster.

“We don’t want to have beef become a special treat item,” Mies said.

More than 1,500 beef cattle producers from across Texas and abroad gathered for the Beef Cattle Short Course to learn more about cattle production and maximizing profits during times of record prices.

The beef cattle inventory in the U.S. is the smallest since the 1950s, with slow, gradual herd rebuilding after decades of drought throughout Texas and the nation.

“Feeder prices are in good shape for a while,” Mies told attendees. “We’ve got record high beef prices at the retail level, lower corn prices and projected record yields on the current crop.”

Read more on the annual short course.

 

 

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish