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Consumers interested in, supportive and understanding of GMOs

In its fourth-annual research project focused on consumers and food, Charleston|Orwig uncovered ample opportunities for companies across the food system to engage with consumers. Results showed that consumers want to know how genetically modified organisms (GMOs) affect health—theirs and their family’s—and are less concerned with political or moral issues surrounding GMOs.

While they see the value of planting GMO crops in drought-stricken areas and they acknowledge the benefits to farmers—39 percent are concerned about potential health issues caused by GMOs in the food they eat.

“Food production has become a hot-button topic and consumers consistently hear about GMOs across a number of channels. We wondered about the average consumer’s perceived knowledge of GMOs, as well as their concerns and whether they were open to learning more,” said Mark Gale, CEO and partner.

  • Sixty percent of consumers representing all levels of understanding want to know how GMOs impact theirs and their family’s health. 
  • Forty-nine percent are interested in research on the safety of GMOs and what items are most likely to be produced with GMOs.
  • Forty-one percent want to know how GMO food is different from food produced without GMOs and about the potential benefits.
TAGS: Soybean Corn
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