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A summer shower moves across the dry lakebed of OC Fisher Reservoir near San Angelo in September 2012 Though reservoir levels recovered somewhat during the winter and spring of 2013 they are currently poised to set alltime record lows across the state according to the state climatologist
<p> A summer shower moves across the dry lakebed of O.C. Fisher Reservoir near San Angelo in September 2012. Though reservoir levels recovered somewhat during the winter and spring of 2013, they are currently poised to set all-time record lows across the state, according to the state climatologist.</p>

Reservoir levels poised to reach all-time lows

Even normal rainfall isn&rsquo;t enough to fill reservoirs in the summertime. &ldquo;If they keep going down at the present rate, it will only take about two more weeks before they will set an all-time record for the difference between how much water they were designed to hold and how much water they actually have in them.&rdquo;

Texas reservoir levels could reach a less than desirable record within the next two weeks—an all-time low.

Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon,Texas State Climatologist in College Station, says even though much of the state has received some rain this summer, it’s not nearly enough to begin refilling reservoirs.

“But of course, even normal rainfall isn’t enough to fill reservoirs in the summertime,” Nielsen-Gammon said. “If they keep going down at the present rate, it will only take about two more weeks before they will set an all-time record for the difference between how much water they were designed to hold and how much water they actually have in them. We continue to set records levels for this time of year, but this will be an all-time record low.”

Read more about the serious condition of Texas reservoirs and other weather-related issues here.

 

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Farmers purchase crop insurance while hoping for the best

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