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Wine grape growers sue over frost protection rules

Wine grape growers in Sonoma and Mendocino counties have sued the California Water Resources Control Board over its new regulations on how farmers use water from the Russian River watershed.

From the Press Democrat:

Grape growers in Sonoma and Mendocino Counties have sued the California Water Resources Control Board over its new regulations on how farmers use water from the Russian River watershed.

The group, called the Russian River Water Users for the Environment, is comprised of several dozen farmers who grow grapes for wine production in the Russian River watershed.

They say the regulations are unconstitutional, too broad and sweeping and don't address steps that growers are already taking to protect salmon and steelhead populations.

The regulations address a frost protection technique in which farmers spray water on their crops when temperatures fall below freezing to keep the buds and vines at a stable 32 degrees. It is typically done in the spring.

The rules, adopted Sept. 20, are intended to safeguard salmon and steelhead populations in the Russian River.

For more, see: Grape growers sue state to block frost protection rules

TAGS: Legislative
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