is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

  • American Agriculturist
  • Beef Producer
  • Corn and Soybean Digest
  • Dakota Farmer
  • Delta Farm Press
  • Farm Futures
  • Farm Industry news
  • Indiana Prairie Farmer
  • Kansas Farmer
  • Michigan Farmer
  • Missouri Ruralist
  • Nebraska Farmer
  • Ohio Farmer
  • Prairie Farmer
  • Southeast Farm Press
  • Southwest Farm Press
  • The Farmer
  • Wallaces Farmer
  • Western Farm Press
  • Western Farmer Stockman
  • Wisconsin Agriculturist

How cool was the 2010 wine grape growing season?

The 2010 wine grape growing season was one of the coolest in recent memory, which led to a much shorter than average growing season; for many vineyards this created serious challenges in getting fruit to ripen adequately. Additional difficulties were created by an abrupt heat spike in late September and subsequently the early heavy rains in some areas.

The 2010 growing season was one of the coolest in recent memory, which led to a much shorter than average growing season; for many vineyards this created serious challenges in getting fruit to ripen adequately. Additional difficulties were created by an abrupt heat spike in late September and subsequently the early heavy rains in some areas. This article focuses on the very unusual temperature conditions of the 2010 season, using as the basis for comparison the data from the temperature stations which the UC Cooperative Extension has been operating throughout the vineyard regions in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara County for the past several years.

The question which was most commonly asked throughout the 2010 season was “how many days behind are we?” Based on detailed regional growing degree day measurements, the season became more delayed as it progressed, and by the end of October some areas were over five weeks behind their 2008-2009 degree day accumulations, with the inland areas being most notably affected.

For the complete article in pdf format, please see: Just how cool was the 2010 growing season?

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish