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Population bomb ticks on; 10 billion people by 2100

The world's population, long expected to stabilize just above 9 billion in the middle of the century, will instead keep growing and may hit 10.1 billion by the year 2100, the United Nations projected in a report released Tuesday.

From the Sacramento Bee:

The world's population, long expected to stabilize just above 9 billion in the middle of the century, will instead keep growing and may hit 10.1 billion by the year 2100, the United Nations projected in a report released Tuesday.

The new report comes just ahead of a demographic milestone, with the world population expected to pass 7 billion in late October, only a dozen years after it surpassed 6 billion. Demographers called the projections a reminder that a problem that helped define 20th century global politics, the population explosion, is far from solved.

"Every billion more people makes life more difficult for everybody – it's as simple as that," said John Bongaarts, a demographer at the Population Council, a research group in New York. "Is it the end of the world? No. Can we feed 10 billion people? Probably. But we obviously would be better off with a smaller population."

For more, see: 10 billion people by 2100? U.N. study counts it likely

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