Ohio Farmer

Horse owners and trainers who race thoroughbreds in Ohio started the scholarship program last year

July 14, 2016

4 Min Read

More than two dozen Ohio 4-H members who plan to attend The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences are receiving $1,000 scholarships from the Ohio Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association

“Twenty-seven $1,000 scholarships for incoming freshmen — that’s huge,” says Pat Whittington, assistant dean for Student Development in the college. “It takes care of 10% of their tuition for the first year. For some of them, that could make the difference in deciding to come to Ohio State, or even whether to go to college at all.”

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The association, whose members are horse owners and trainers who race thoroughbreds in Ohio, started the scholarship program last year, explains David Basler, executive director. At the beginning, the group self-administered the program.

“We didn’t get as many applications as we hoped for last year, so this year we worked with Ohio State to make the 4-H scholarships part of the college’s scholarship program,” he says.

The recipients must be members of Ohio 4-H and have a high school grade point average of 2.5 or above. Preference was given to students who have experience working with horses or who have plans to pursue studies in equine sciences. The association also directed the college to choose students from across the state.

“Our industry is tied at the hip to agriculture in the state of Ohio,” Basler says. “It’s important to give back to the community, and connecting with 4-H seems like a great way to do that.”

Whittington says once the plans for the scholarships were finalized, the college reviewed its roster of incoming students to find those who fit the requirements. Notifications were sent in mid-June. “Hopefully, it’s a nice surprise for the recipients,” Basler says.

The association also provides similar scholarships to FFA members who attend any Ohio college or university, Basler says. The association plans to continue the program annually.

'Unheard-of' college scholarship opportunities
Both Ohio State and the college provide many types of scholarships to students who complete the application forms, Whittington said.

“We make it easy for students,” he said. “There are really only two scholarship applications they need to fill out — one for the university and one for the college, which makes them eligible for scholarships designated for our college and the departments in our college. It really makes a difference.

“This year, of the incoming freshmen who completed the college’s scholarship application, 80% have been offered at least one college or department scholarship,” Whittington says. “That doesn’t include scholarships they might get elsewhere. That’s almost unheard of. And it’s due to the generosity of donors who realize the high cost of college and want to do what they can to make it manageable for our students.”

The recipients of this year’s HBPA 4-H scholarships are:

•Maile Moyer, Champaign County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Biosciences.
•Amy Caughenbaugh, Clark County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Biosciences.
•Sarah Robinson, Clark County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Biosciences.
•Kelly Deatherage, Clinton County, pursuing studies in Food Science and Technology.
•John Fischer, Darke County, pursuing studies in Agribusiness and Applied Economics.
•Josephine Montoney, Fairfield County, pursuing studies in Agricultural Communication.
•Erin Johnson, Fayette County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Industries.
•Hannah Cochran, Franklin County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Biosciences.
•Mason Creager, Fulton County, pursuing studies in Agribusiness and Applied Economics.
•Jackson Howard, Geauga County, pursuing studies in Environmental Policy and Decision Making.
•Meredith Oglesby, Highland County, pursuing studies in Agricultural Communication.
•Emily Cote, Licking County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Veterinary Technology.
•Katherine Garen, Madison County, pursuing studies in Agribusiness and Applied Economics.
•Emma Nicholson, Morrow County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Biosciences.
•Emily Derck, Paulding County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Biosciences.
•Charlee Prushing, Pickaway County, pursuing studies in Agriscience Education.
•Johnathon Cottingim, Preble County, pursuing studies in Agribusiness and Applied Economics.
•Ross Schroeder, Putnam County, pursuing studies in Agricultural Systems Management.
•Collin Berg, Richland County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Biosciences.
•Paige Doklovic, Richland County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Veterinary Technology.
•Lauren Hamer, Seneca County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Biosciences.
•Brittany Weller, Seneca County, pursuing studies in Agriscience Education.
•Elizabeth Landis, Shelby County, pursuing studies in Agriscience Education.
•Samantha Stevenson, Stark County, pursuing studies in Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering.
•Emily Thompson, Stark County, pursuing studies in Animal Sciences — Animal Biosciences.
•Marlee Stollar, Washington County, pursuing studies in Agricultural Communication.
•Forrest Lang, Wayne County, pursuing studies in Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering.

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