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Check out new ways to get seed in ground

What’s New From the Shows: Grain drills, air seeders, plot drills and more make up this lineup of products.

By Farm Progress staff

If you’ve got any kind of seed to sow, there is a drill or seeder out there that will help you do it effectively. And based on what Farm Progress editors found at fall farm shows, companies are continuously looking for ways to tweak the drills and seeding equipment they offer to help you do it even more efficiently.

Consider the lead product in this offering, for example. It’s a Brillion seeder, long considered the gold standard for seeding small-seeded forage crops, particularly alfalfa. A used Brillion drill brought far more than many onlookers expected at a farm sale in April. Those who seed alfalfa and other small-seeded crops weren’t surprised.

Brillion seeders have a reputation not only for quality in construction, but also for being designed to prepare a good seedbed, drop the seed effectively and cover it correctly, leading to good stand establishment in most cases.

Landoll, which now markets the Brillion brand, was excited to show off its 16-foot model introduced this year. The largest previous model in the lineup was 12 feet wide. Spokespeople said that several customers with lots of acres to cover had asked for a machine that could deliver the same quality but let them cover more acres in a day. The result is the new 16-foot model.

There’s also high demand for drills for planting food plots and pollinator plantings. Several companies, including Woods and Kasco, have responded with seeders that fit these needs perfectly. Both companies offer models that can be powered by a utility tractor or pulled by an ATV or UTV. Each offers drills in small-enough widths to hold down the overall cost of the seeder.

They’re ideal for two or more farmers to buy together, or for a soil and water conservation district or other group — such as a chapter of Pheasants Forever — to buy and rent to farmers who want to establish either food plots or a pollinator plot at reasonable cost.

Seeding forbs and warm-seasoned grasses for pollinator plots requires specialized equipment. Yet one farmer seldom has enough acreage or does it often enough to justify buying a tool just for that reason.

Check out all the new products related to drilling and seeding in this slideshow.    

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