Farm Progress

Research has determined ways to stretch Ohio’s strawberry growing season from April through the end of November outside or in a greenhouse.

May 4, 2017

2 Min Read
BERRY PRODUCTION: A May 25 workshop at the Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon invites guests to step into a greenhouse to see different ways of growing strawberries.

What’s the best way to grow strawberries and how do you get more berries? Ohio State University Extension has the night of May 25 planned to showcase strawberries geared to pique interest.

The workshop at the South Centers Auditorium in Piketon invites guests to step into a greenhouse and see how strawberry plants stacked atop each other grow year-round. Perhaps even more unusual, a robot will demonstrate how it can eliminate the back-straining work of picking berries.

Because taste is what sells a strawberry, field night attendees can participate in a blind taste test of 18 varieties of strawberries, including some grown in California and Florida.

“We wanted to throw those in along with the 15 varieties we picked from our field just to see if they can tell the difference between store-bought berries and good old freshly-picked berries,” says Brad Bergefurd, horticulture specialist with Extension.

Since 1999, Bergefurd has researched strawberry production, and his current study, which is funded through a USDA grant, examines ways to extend the strawberry growing season in Ohio, where plants are typically harvested in June. Using various methods, Bergefurd has determined ways to stretch Ohio’s strawberry growing season from April through the end of November outside or in a greenhouse.

Bergefurd, who is leading the workshop, will share his knowledge on production technologies that can significantly increase yields.

For example, strawberries can grow outdoors during winter on a bed of plastic. The method involves planting strawberries in September and growing them over the winter using plastic to keep the soil warm and keep the weeds down. The method leads to larger, sweeter berries during an earlier harvest period.

The field night will be at the OSU South Centers Auditorium, 1864 Shyville Road in Piketon, and will start at 5:30 p.m., with a light supper. Registration is $25 per person or $40 per farm, up to three people. To register, contact Charissa Gardner at [email protected] or at 740-289-2071, ext. 132. The registration deadline is May 23.

Source: OSU Extension

 

Subscribe to receive top agriculture news
Be informed daily with these free e-newsletters

You May Also Like