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Corn+Soybean Digest
Communities of local farmers who work together to defeat resistant weeds that grow outside of fields is having a positive impact
<p>Communities of local farmers who work together to defeat resistant weeds that grow outside of fields is having a positive impact.</p>

Community weed control

Think Different Using a zero-tolerance approach to weed control, farmers can team up to battle resistant weeds along highways, turnrows and common areas that harbor weed reservoirs. For example, rainwater spreads pigweeds, making it a communal problem. This approach has made a difference for Clay County, Arkansas, where farmers are fighting herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth. It&rsquo;s not uncommon here for a farmer to spend over $100,000 on herbicides &ndash; plus more on weed-chopping crews &ndash; and still have pigweeds, says Andy Vangilder, county Extension agent. &ldquo;Whenever a farmer is riding down the turnrow and sees a weed, he goes and gets it,&rdquo; says Mike Morgan, a Rector, Ark., cotton farmer and weed fighter.

Mike Morgan lives the pigweed nightmare and wants to spare others. The Clay County, Ark., farmer teamed up with his neighbors to defeat Palmer amaranth in ditches, turnrows (headlands) and communal areas. This new weed weapon, a collaboration of farmers, is bent on stopping resistant weeds wherever they grow.

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