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What's best management plan for nematodes in your cotton?

What's best management plan for nematodes in your cotton?

The latest free Focus on Cotton webcast pairs cotton growers’ situations and needs with the right nematode management practices.

Nematodes are a silent killer in many U.S. cotton fields. And management can be complicated.

Options are different for different nematodes species and population densities, yield goals, different cropping systems and different levels of soil variability.

The latest free Focus on Cotton webcast, published courtesy of Cotton Incorporated and the Plant Management Network, pairs cotton growers’ situations and needs with the right nematode management practices.

The webcast, titled Management of Plant Parasitic Nematodes in Cotton, by Professor Terry Wheeler at Texas A&M University, was developed to help consultants, cotton producers, and other practitioners in the cotton growing regions of the U.S. where nematodes effect cotton production.

By the end of this presentation, the practitioner should have a good understanding of what management options should be used for specific situations.

This and other talks in the Focus on Cotton webcast resource can be viewed for free courtesy of Cotton Incorporated at: Plant Management Network.

TAGS: Management
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