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Should you replant your corn?

Should you replant your corn?

Assessing corn fields for replanting purposes when stands are marginal depends on lots of factors, so don’t just focus on plant population.

Rains have swamped your recently planted corn fields. How do you know if you should replant and if you do, how do you adapt your management plan?

Assessing corn fields for replanting purposes when stands are marginal depends on lots of factors, so don’t just focus on plant population, say Erick Larson, Mississippi Extension grain specialist, and Jason Bond, Mississippi Extension weed scientist.

The plant population gives a baseline of potential, but actual corn productivity or outcome is also very dependent upon seedling spacing and emergence uniformity. Unfortunately, poor stands are always going to have some variability issues that we need to assess, they say.

Read their recommendations at Corn replanting guidelines and management issues with wet weather.

 

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TAGS: Management
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