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Farmland, The Movie: Go See It!

Farmland, The Movie: Go See It!

More important, take a friend who may not have a farm background

Editor's Note: We have added the movie trailer at the end of this blog.

This is a busy time of year, but each of us in agriculture needs to try to take time to invite friends to go to the movies soon.  "Farmland," the movie, is coming to theatres starting May 1.  Look on the website for a location near you. 

If you haven't heard about this film yet, you need to. 

The documentary was made by award winning director, James Moll.  His documentary work has earned him an Academy Award, Emmys, and a Grammy.  He is a heavy hitter who is helping to tell the story about modern day agriculture. 

Related: Farmland Film Review: From a Farmer's Standpoint

"Farmland" follows six young farmers over the course of several months to tell about the struggles and triumphs of a growing season and their lives. (Farmland promo photo)

Randy Krotz, CEO of the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance shares that "(James Moll) literally had full creative control of the film."  This is important because James Moll is well known in Hollywood, and his creative guidance is sharing the word about farming today.  

As Krotz says, the film "gets in front of millions of consumers who are 5-6 generations off the farm … opening their minds and hearts to wanting to understand more about food production."

Related: Meet the Faces of "Farmland"

The film follows six young farmers over the course of several months to tell about the struggles and triumphs of a growing season and their lives.  They each have different types of farming operations and are from different regions of the nation. Ultimately, their passion for farming and ranching shines through in each of them.

Krotz explains that this is a "consumer oriented film to core consumer markets." He goes on to share that this process is a "new world for me and the ag industry as a whole to make a film told by the farmers." 

The past several weeks have been a whirlwind with many previews to the film and film festivals. People watch to see which celebrities attend, and often what they wear gets as much news as the film itself, but still, they are standing in front of the Farmland banner. 

Related: The Making of 'Farmland,' Ag's Newest Documentary

The most striking is to see the reaction to the film and get the questions and the comments about what they didn't understand about agriculture, and how they're more at ease with livestock production.  One of the most powerful moments in the film is listening to how these young producers care for their animals; so much of the time that's misrepresented in the mass media. 

When you see the "Farmland" film, you will be moved.  You'll recognize your own farm through the young farmers' experiences. You might even get a few tears in your eyes. I did, both times I viewed the film.

This is an important film for each of us in agriculture to see.  Equally important as it is for you to see the film is for you to take a friend who may not have a farm background.  Discussing this film is a great way to open dialog about what you do on your farm and how your farm fits into the food chain.

The opinions of LaVell Winsor are not necessarily those of Farm Futures or the Penton Farm Progress Group.

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