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Getting the planter in the field

This week there was a lot of dust flying in NW Ohio. I would guess that 2% of the corn has been planted. My family started planting on Friday. We have a 20-year-old planter with dry fertilizer boxes so we needed to get the planter in the field and make sure that everything moves like it is supposed to. I am hoping for rain this week so that I can run an errand to central Indiana to pick up a few hog slats for my confinement building. My largest tractor is also 20 years old and is in the shop now. Hopefully everything can be fixed on it in one day. When things break on it during planting season, we run and get the parts wherever the dealer can find them. We don't wait on next day air shipment.  

About 10 years ago, I was involved with a para-church project that started a farm operation in Ukraine. It failed mainly because there were no dealers who had repair shops or parts. Basically, if anything broke, the people who worked on the farm fixed things as best they could with whatever they could find. That resulted in a lot of floundering around and that wasted precious days at planting and harvest time. That gave me a real appreciation for the parts and service network we have in America. 

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