is part of the Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

  • American Agriculturist
  • Beef Producer
  • Corn and Soybean Digest
  • Dakota Farmer
  • Delta Farm Press
  • Farm Futures
  • Farm Industry news
  • Indiana Prairie Farmer
  • Kansas Farmer
  • Michigan Farmer
  • Missouri Ruralist
  • Nebraska Farmer
  • Ohio Farmer
  • Prairie Farmer
  • Southeast Farm Press
  • Southwest Farm Press
  • The Farmer
  • Wallaces Farmer
  • Western Farm Press
  • Western Farmer Stockman
  • Wisconsin Agriculturist
Corn+Soybean Digest

April 11 Brazil Production Update with Tyler Bruch

[video: id=streamhoster-http://web18.streamhoster.com/pentonmedia/penton/djohnson/b4ba53bb-fa4b-484e-af4b-44601778828a.flv, thumb=http://web18.streamhoster.com/pentonmedia/penton/djohnson/634067649804494057.gif]

A big logistical issue for Bahia farmers this harvest season is the wait time for trucks once they get to a dumping station. Tyler shows us a line of trucks inside the station, and adds there are another 140 or so waiting to get in to dump. They’ll end up waiting nearly 24 hours just to unload the grain that took only 45 minutes or so to load at the field. Part of the battle is that there are 45% less trucks in Bahia this year.

Cotton is progressing at Global Ag Farms in Bahia, Brazil. They’re scouting and counting, applying fungicides and control for boll weevils. The plants in the field have nicely formed bolls, good tap roots and more flowers. Tyler would like to see more bolls on the bottom of the plant, and says it’d be nice to have about 45 more days of good weather with timely rains and it should be a great yielding year.

One of the problems Global Ag is seeing in cotton is "Black Bolls," which happens with some of the consistent rains that they've experienced without a chance for the plant to dry out. When it doesn’t dry out, the cotton bolls are more susceptible to rotting. Ideally we would like it to rain about every 5-6 days with sun in between but sometimes we don't always get what we want. Tyler says conditions are normal right now, and that the rotten bolls are just a part of growing cotton.

Click here to view Tyler Bruch's Brazil Video Archive

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish