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Serving: WI

Dairy and Beef Well-Being Conference planned Feb. 22

John P Kelly/Getty Images Hereford cattle
ANIMAL CARE: UW-Madison Division of Extension is providing a platform for learning about current cattle well-being topics for farmers, veterinarians and allied industries at the Wisconsin Dairy and Beef Well-Being Conference.
Registration is due by Feb. 7 for the event being held at the Farm Wisconsin Discovery Center, Manitowoc.

Have you wondered how to increase the animal well-being on your farm? Are you interested in continuing education for your farm employees and yourself? The University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension is providing a platform for learning about current cattle well-being topics for farmers, veterinarians and allied industries at the Wisconsin Dairy and Beef Well-Being Conference.

“Our focus on dairy and beef well-being, health and handling has proven to be a valuable asset for producers and processors alike,” says Aerica Bjurstrom, Kewaunee County Extension agriculture agent. This year’s conference is being held Feb. 22 at the Farm Wisconsin Discovery Center, Manitowoc.

“It is our intent to foster engaging sessions that include the latest research and industry information,” Bjurstrom says.

Expert speakers

To help achieve these goals, a team of expert speakers will discuss the current cattle well-being concerns of Wisconsin’s farmers. The conference will include Dairy FARM 4.0 updates. The day will feature Emily Yeiser-Stepp, vice president of the National Dairy FARM (Farmers Assuring Responsible Management)

Program, outlining critical points of care where dairy farms are missing FARM 4.0 compliance.

The results of a 2019 disbudding survey will be highlighted by Jennifer Van Os, UW-Madison Extension animal welfare specialist, and Sarah Adcock, UW-Madison assistant professor of animal welfare. Jimena Laporta, UW-Madison assistant professor of lactation physiology, will focus on heat stress and implementing improved ventilation for dry cows.

Fitness for transport and using genetics to improve animal health will be discussed, and rounding out the program, Kate Creutzinger, assistant professor of dairy animal welfare at UW-River Falls, will present maternity cow health management strategies.

To ensure meals and materials for participants, the registration deadline is Feb. 7.

  • The cost is $50 per farmer or allied industry personnel. ARPAS continuing education credits are available.
  • A $25 additional fee for veterinarian CEUs will be charged; 3.5 continuing education credits have been approved.
  • The conference is National FARM Program-endorsed and qualifies for one Beef Quality Assurance recertification credit.
  • Registrations received after Feb. 7 will be charged a $15 late fee.

For more information and to register, contact Union Services at conferences@union.wisc.edu or 608-890-1077. For additional information regarding the conference, or sponsorship opportunities, please contact co-chairpersons Aerica Bjurstrom at 920-338-7138 or aerica.bjurstrom@wisc.edu, or Marathon County Extension Dairy Agent Heather Schlesser at 715-261-1239 or heather.schlesser@wisc.edu.

Visit dairy.extension.wisc.edu for the program agenda, registration information and information about our conference sponsors.

Source: UW-Extension, which is solely responsible for the information provided and is wholly owned by the source. Informa Business Media and all its subsidiaries are not responsible for any of the content contained in this information asset.
TAGS: Dairy Beef
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